Agape Love Shawl Crochet Version and 9 Tips for working with Mohair

Happy Valentine’s Day! Treat your Valentine or yourself to this soft, luxurious scarf designed by Judy Busby at Jems Luxe Fibers and translated to crochet by me, Katie Clark.

Agape Love is an unconditional love that transcends and persists regardless of the circumstance.  Agape is the Greek term for Love – the highest expression of love – a pure and  selfless thing.

This shawl is a fun and quick crochet using minis and mohair.  Every row begins with decreases that shapes this colorful shawl.  Have fun with your colors and let it reflect the love you’ve experienced, how it has shaped and reshaped you.  God’s love for you and me is passionate, pure and beyond anything we’ve ever experienced, accepting us as we are.  He reminds us of our worth and beauty as His daughters.  He loves us with unconditional Agape Love.  God is Love!

Judy Busby, Jems Luxe Fibers

If you’ve never used mohair, you’ll find it takes some patience to work with. So before we get into the pattern, let me give you a few tips for working with mohair.

Tip #1

Use a larger hook or needle to retain loftiness. The wonderful thing about mohair is the silky halo of fiber that surrounds the core. Using a hook or needle that is too small will compact the fibers, negating the effect.

Tip #2

Work loosely. For the same reason as above, use a gentle hand. Or if you have a tendency to stitch tightly, go up another size or two.

Tip #3

Hold with another yarn to add softness, halo & warmth. The fibers aren’t just beautiful. They are very useful for insulating. Used alone, mohair is surprisingly warm. So adding it to another yarn will make your finished piece that much warmer.

Tip #4

Ask your LYS to wind your yarn. Especially if you’ve never used mohair before, because it is so clingy. You don’t want to be frustrated with your yarn before you even begin your project. If you must wind it yourself, try loosening fibers before winding by gently spreading the strands apart to keep them from matting together as you wind.

Tip #5

Do not work cake or ball from inside. I’m a work-the-ball-from-the-inside kind of girl. I do it even when it’s not recommended. Except for mohair. Ever. The fibers pull on each other and you end up with a big mess. Ask me how I know.

Tip #6

Use excellent lighting. This is always important, but especially when using mohair. The halo can make the core strand difficult to see. Good lighting can help and if you really can’t make out your stitches, try holding it up to the light.

Tip #7

Don’t worry so much about mistakes. The halo hides a lot. But if necessary, hold your work up to light to check.

Tip #8

Be patient when taking out stitches. It’s inevitable that you will have to take some out eventually. But try not to get frustrated. Don’t pull so hard that you rip the core, but don’t be afraid to tear fuzz to separate the strands.

Tip #8

Most of all, be patient! It’s is different than any other fiber. But the soft luxurious mohair is worth it!

Now on to the Agape Love Shawl Crochet Version!

Agape Love Shawl

Difficulty
Beginner

Finished Measurements
Approx. 90 inches by 6 inches

Materials
Agape Love Minis and Nimbus Set

or

1 skein Jems Luxe Fibers Nimbus in Ruby Red MC
1 mini skein Jems Luxe Fibers Luxe Sock in each of these colors
Aphrodite CC1
Rubellite CC2
Agape CC3
Ruby Red CC4
Apple of Discord CC5

US Size N (9mm) hook

Tapestry needle

Gauge
3 sc = 1 inch
Gauge not critical

Begin Shawl
Holding MC and CC1 together, ch 270 loosely.

Row 1: Working in back loop of ch, sk first ch, sc3tog, sc across to last 3 chs, sc3tog. Turn.

Row 2: Ch 1, sc3tog, sc across to last 3 sts, sc3tog. Turn.

Rows 3 & 4: Rpt row 2.

*Break CC1. Pick up CC2 and hold it together with MC.
Rpt row 2 five times (or as many times as desired if you have extra yarn).

Rpt from * for each mini skein. Finish off both strands. Weave in ends. Block as desired.

Terms and Conditions

Traveling with Stitch Markers

I just got back from Boston, and I didn’t lose a single stitch marker! That is a big feat after knitting on airplanes and subways and in meetings (don’t tell!) and sessions. I usually drop stitch markers just sitting on the couch, so I had to figure out a way to hold on to them. My secret is a life line for my stitch markers. Here’s how I did it.

Set up:

Thread the Life Line through markers
with a tapestry needle.
  1. Choose a sock weight yarn in contrasting color. Cut a length at least as long as your needles and up to as wide as your project’s finished size.
  2. With your stitch markers in place on the needles, thread the life line through each stitch marker on your needles.
    • If you have to add stitch markers throughout your pattern, I recommend using open stitch markers that clip closed or bulb pins so you can add them to the life line later.
    • If you use closed markers, you must add them to the life line in the correct place before you continue to step 3. They will dangle from your life line as you work, and that’s ok.
  3. Choose 2 extra stitch markers the same size or bigger. Tie one to each end of your life line to keep it from becoming loose from your work. Your last marker can stay on the needle or dangle free.

Working with the Life Line:

  • Always keep the life line on the same side throughout your row.
  • Do not allow the life line to wrap or yarn over your needles as you work.
  • I recommend working with the life line on the side facing you. Stitch to the first marker. With the life line in front, slip marker purlwise.
Stitched over marker
This is what it looks like when you carry your life line on the opposite side and you slip the marker with the yarn in back.
  • If you have to turn in the middle of the row (for example, when working wraps and turns), the life line must fall to the side away from you. In this case, work to the marker, and with the working yarn in front, slip the marker purlwise. If you don’t do this, the marker will be stitched in like this:

Trouble shooting:

  • If you stitch over your marker as above, you can continue your row. When you come back to the marker, slip it off the needle, pull the marker through the stitch to free it, and place it back on the needle.
  • If you wrap or yarn over your life line, it will become entangled in your work. You must unknit back to the mistake and unwrap the life line from the needle.
  • I prefer using bulb pins with this technique. The large end sits in place on the needle and the small end dangles down a little bit allowing the life line to hang out of your way as you stitch.

The Question Most Asked

crochet knit icon

I teach both knitting and crochet. And I teach a lot of beginners who don’t know the difference. The question they ask me most is:

What’s better? Knit or crochet?

That’s a totally subjective question. Ask a knitter and they will probably say knitting. Ask a crocheter and they will probably say crochet. Even those who do both may waffle and say, “They are just different.”

I have my opinions of what’s better and easier, but here’s some hopefully unbiased information with a side-by-side comparison so you can make up your own mind.

After you look over the info, keep reading for my answer!

Crochet vs knitting.jpg

Crochet vs knitting (pdf download)

So, when a student asks me, I say I prefer crochet. Why? Because it works up faster and mistakes are easier to fix. It’s just a personal preference, and these days I knit as much or more than crochet. There are things I like better about knitting, but my heart is in crochet!

Did I miss anything? What’s your opinion? Comment your preference and why!