Game On! Make a better Pom Pom

Pom poms are adorable on a hat or ends of a scarf, so here’s an improvement on a classic. The Game Changer Crocheted Pom Pom!

Why is this pom better?

• It is washable and dryable Because it has no loose ends, as long as your yarn can be laundered, so can this pom pom be laundered.

• It can be made with any yarn Most pom poms are made with wool yarn because the wool fibers cling to each other and keep it from falling apart. This one is made with a crochet chain, so it’s structurally sound. That means you can use any yarn, even a novelty yarn, and it won’t fall apart.

• It’s child proof Do you have a kid that picks at everything? Then you know, if you pick at a pom pom, the pieces fall out! This pom pom cannot be pulled apart.

Now you know you need one! How do you make it? Look no further.

Game Changer Crochet Pom Pom

This pattern makes an approximately 3 inch pom pom. To make a larger pom pom, use longer chain loops in round 2. To make it smaller, use shorter loops.

To make a full pom pom, the sts have to be squeezed in. It can be difficult at the end, but the more chain loops you squeeze in, the fuller the pom pom will be.

Rnd 1: In a magic ring and leaving a long tail, ch 1, 20 sc, join with a sl st to first sc. Pull your magic ring closed very firmly.

Rnd 2: (Ch 10, sl in same st) 4 times. 5 ch lps made. Rpt for each st around.
80 ch lps

Finish off leaving a long tail. Being careful not to tie over any chain loops, tie the tails together very firmly. Use these tails to sew pom pom in place.

Bonus

Here’s a hint for attaching your pom pom to a hat. This is a very firm attachment and there is no knot on the inside to rub against a sensitive head!

Draw both tails through the top of the hat a couple of time. Then draw them back to the outside. Wind the tails in opposite directions a couple of times around the base of the pom pom and tie very firmly. Trim ends to just a little shorter than the the loops of the pom pom.

Need a pattern to attach your pom pom to? Here is my Basic Crochet Beanie Pattern for free!

Traveling with Stitch Markers

I just got back from Boston, and I didn’t lose a single stitch marker! That is a big feat after knitting on airplanes and subways and in meetings (don’t tell!) and sessions. I usually drop stitch markers just sitting on the couch, so I had to figure out a way to hold on to them. My secret is a life line for my stitch markers. Here’s how I did it.

Set up:

Thread the Life Line through markers
with a tapestry needle.
  1. Choose a sock weight yarn in contrasting color. Cut a length at least as long as your needles and up to as wide as your project’s finished size.
  2. With your stitch markers in place on the needles, thread the life line through each stitch marker on your needles.
    • If you have to add stitch markers throughout your pattern, I recommend using open stitch markers that clip closed or bulb pins so you can add them to the life line later.
    • If you use closed markers, you must add them to the life line in the correct place before you continue to step 3. They will dangle from your life line as you work, and that’s ok.
  3. Choose 2 extra stitch markers the same size or bigger. Tie one to each end of your life line to keep it from becoming loose from your work. Your last marker can stay on the needle or dangle free.

Working with the Life Line:

  • Always keep the life line on the same side throughout your row.
  • Do not allow the life line to wrap or yarn over your needles as you work.
  • I recommend working with the life line on the side facing you. Stitch to the first marker. With the life line in front, slip marker purlwise.
Stitched over marker
This is what it looks like when you carry your life line on the opposite side and you slip the marker with the yarn in back.
  • If you have to turn in the middle of the row (for example, when working wraps and turns), the life line must fall to the side away from you. In this case, work to the marker, and with the working yarn in front, slip the marker purlwise. If you don’t do this, the marker will be stitched in like this:

Trouble shooting:

  • If you stitch over your marker as above, you can continue your row. When you come back to the marker, slip it off the needle, pull the marker through the stitch to free it, and place it back on the needle.
  • If you wrap or yarn over your life line, it will become entangled in your work. You must unknit back to the mistake and unwrap the life line from the needle.
  • I prefer using bulb pins with this technique. The large end sits in place on the needle and the small end dangles down a little bit allowing the life line to hang out of your way as you stitch.

The Question Most Asked

crochet knit icon

I teach both knitting and crochet. And I teach a lot of beginners who don’t know the difference. The question they ask me most is:

What’s better? Knit or crochet?

That’s a totally subjective question. Ask a knitter and they will probably say knitting. Ask a crocheter and they will probably say crochet. Even those who do both may waffle and say, “They are just different.”

I have my opinions of what’s better and easier, but here’s some hopefully unbiased information with a side-by-side comparison so you can make up your own mind.

After you look over the info, keep reading for my answer!

Crochet vs knitting.jpg

Crochet vs knitting (pdf download)

So, when a student asks me, I say I prefer crochet. Why? Because it works up faster and mistakes are easier to fix. It’s just a personal preference, and these days I knit as much or more than crochet. There are things I like better about knitting, but my heart is in crochet!

Did I miss anything? What’s your opinion? Comment your preference and why!