Making Chores More Fun?!

Free Pattern: Scrubbies

Have you been productive during the Shelter-In-Place? Did you start to tackle projects or to-do lists you’ve been putting off? Or have you perfected your procrastination skills by avoiding chores when you can’t even leave your home?

I’m the eternal procrastinator! I have projects and tasks that “I’ll get to one of these days.” Some are fun, like getting around to that design that’s been floating around in my head. (Hopefully, you’ll see the product of some of those soon!) Some are working through yarn in my stash. Some are just chores I don’t want to do so I avoid them like the Coronavirus! Ha!

Well, the last two things just came together! I had a bag of various scrubby yarns I’d been waiting to work up and try out. I finally found some time to make kitchen scrubbies. Now, I hate housework, but it’s a little bit better when you have good tools that do the job. I love my handmade dish cloths, and I expect I’ll love these scrubbies as well.

So, here are a few patterns for your scrubby yarns that are good for your kitchen or your bath. Plus, I’ve added a few options you may want to try out for yourself!

Scrubby Square
Scrubby Square
with Eyelet Edging
Scrubby Pouf

Materials

Scrubby yarn (one ball will make 2-3 scrubbies)
or cotton dish yarn
US I Hook or hook for
Basic Crochet Supplies
Tapestry Needle

Scrubby Square

Ch 4, 4 dc in 4th ch from hook. Turn.
-4 dc

Ch 3 (does not count as dc), 3 dc in 1st st, dc to last st, 3 dc in last st. Turn.
-8 dc

Rpt last row until you have 24 sts. Begin decrease rows as follows.

Ch 3, dc3tog, dc to last 3 sts, dc3tog. Turn.
-20 dc

Rpt last row until you have 4 sts left.

Last row: Ch 2, dc3tog. Finish off. Weave in ends.

Option: Replace the double crochets with front and back post double crochets for more scrubby ridges. Work bpdc on the right side and fpdc on the back side.

Scrubby Square with Eyelet Edging

Ch 5 (counts as dc & ch-1 sp), dc in 5th ch from hook. Turn.
-2 dc, 1 ch-1 sp

Ch 4 (counts as dc & ch-1 sp throughout), dc in first st, dc in ch-1 sp, [dc, ch 1, dc] in top of turning ch. Turn.
-5 dc, 2 ch-1 sp

Ch 4, dc in first st, dc in ch-1 sp, dc in each st across to ch-1 sp, dc in ch-1 sp, [dc, ch 1, dc] in top of turning ch. Turn.
-9 dc, 2 ch-1 sp

Rpt last row until you have 25 dc. Begin decrease rows as follows.

Ch 2, sk ch-1 sp, dc in each dc across to 1 st before ch-1 sp, dc2tog the next st and the last st skipping ch-1 sp. Turn.
-23 dc

Ch 2, sk first 2 dc, dc across to last 3 sts, dc2tog the next st and the last st skipping 1 dc. Turn.
-19 dc

Rpt last row until you have 3 sts left.

Last row: Ch 2, sk next st, dc in last st. Finish off. Weave in ends.

Option: Red Heart’s Sparkly Scrubby yarn isn’t very absorbent. To make a more cloth-like scrubby, hold it together with an all cotton yarn. Be sure to go up at least 2 hook sizes.

Scrubby Pouf

Work in rounds.

Ch 4, 24 dc in 4th ch from hook. Join w sl st to first dc.

Ch 3 (does not count as dc), 3 dc in each st around. Join w sl st to first dc.
-72 dc

Ch 3, dc3tog around. Join w sl st to first dc.
-24 dc

Rpt last rnd once.
-8 dc

Finish off. Use a tapestry needle to stitch last 8 sts closed. Tie firmly. Thread end into center of pouf.

Option: For a soap saver, work the first round of double crochets around a small elastic hairband. When you are done, insert a sample size soap into the center through the elastic.

View More Patterns

Game On! Make a better Pom Pom

Pom poms are adorable on a hat or ends of a scarf, so here’s an improvement on a classic. The Game Changer Crocheted Pom Pom!

Why is this pom better?

• It is washable and dryable Because it has no loose ends, as long as your yarn can be laundered, so can this pom pom be laundered.

• It can be made with any yarn Most pom poms are made with wool yarn because the wool fibers cling to each other and keep it from falling apart. This one is made with a crochet chain, so it’s structurally sound. That means you can use any yarn, even a novelty yarn, and it won’t fall apart.

• It’s child proof Do you have a kid that picks at everything? Then you know, if you pick at a pom pom, the pieces fall out! This pom pom cannot be pulled apart.

Now you know you need one! How do you make it? Look no further.

Game Changer Crochet Pom Pom

This pattern makes an approximately 3 inch pom pom. To make a larger pom pom, use longer chain loops in round 2. To make it smaller, use shorter loops.

To make a full pom pom, the sts have to be squeezed in. It can be difficult at the end, but the more chain loops you squeeze in, the fuller the pom pom will be.

Rnd 1: In a magic ring and leaving a long tail, ch 1, 20 sc, join with a sl st to first sc. Pull your magic ring closed very firmly.

Rnd 2: (Ch 10, sl in same st) 4 times. 5 ch lps made. Rpt for each st around.
80 ch lps

Finish off leaving a long tail. Being careful not to tie over any chain loops, tie the tails together very firmly. Use these tails to sew pom pom in place.

Bonus

Here’s a hint for attaching your pom pom to a hat. This is a very firm attachment and there is no knot on the inside to rub against a sensitive head!

Draw both tails through the top of the hat a couple of time. Then draw them back to the outside. Wind the tails in opposite directions a couple of times around the base of the pom pom and tie very firmly. Trim ends to just a little shorter than the the loops of the pom pom.

Need a pattern to attach your pom pom to? Here is my Basic Crochet Beanie Pattern for free!

Zombies are Crap at Knitting

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But I love stitching them! I made a double knit Zombie Scarf that is sure to keep my brother-in-law warm in the zombie apocolypse!

And, so everyone will be prepared for the impending doom, here are charts you can use for knitting, cross stitching, needlepoint, or any reason you might have for needing to stitch zombies. Included are a zombie head, Crossed Winchester rifles, and a biohazard. If you would like to duplicate my scarf above download the full pattern here. If you have never tried double knitting, you will want to start with a simpler pattern like my Double Knit Scarf pattern. Enjoy!

Hoarding and the Creative Spirit

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I enjoy being in homes that are neat and orderly and pretty. Then I go home and I am in a mess. So I start looking around for things to get rid of. But I don’t want to get rid of my stuff!

Lately, I’m having to pare down some things cause of some changes in our house. I’ve spent time going through my pattern books (No!) and my yarn (NO!) wondering why this process is so hard.

Psych students pay attention… Why do I have all this stuff?

My stuff is raw material for creativity. I have a cabinet full–and then some–of craft supplies and random odd items and I see potential in all of it. For example, I have been saving wine corks for years. Years. I’ve had ideas floating around my head about what to do with them, but haven’t had the time to implement anything. Now, I’ve found a super cute pattern that I will make time for in the next few weeks.

http://www.simplynotable.com/2012/pint-sized-pines-in-a-cork-forest/

My stuff is reminders of people and times I love. Talking to friends whose homes I admire, they get rid of things with no second thought. But I keep things cause I have personal attachments. Looking around, my shelves are overflowing, but as I look at items individually, I am happy thinking about whatever attachment I have to it. I’m happy to keep anything I feel that way about, and I’m happy to get rid of anything that has no personal significance.

My stuff includes a lot of toys. Curiosity feeds creativity, so I have a lot of toys, especially STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) toys. My designs sometimes stem from ideas developed from technology and engineering and the “What If” questions I ask.

So I have a choice to make. I can clean up my house and make it more pleasant to be in. Or I can keep my stuff that makes me happy and drives creativity.

Please excuse my mess. I think I’ll keep my stuff.

20180822_213938.jpgAbove: My craft room in the midst of an overhaul
Below: 33 gallon bag of yarn to donate
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